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to adapt. that was not so much an advantage because the environment did not change quickly. it is the normal process of biological evolution, changing behavior over thousands of generations. it is good enough for non medallion species until the cretaceous extinction event sixty-five million years ago. we see geological evidence of it everywhere in the world, something dramatic happened to change the environment suddenly sixty-five million years ago. there are theories about it having to do with a meteor but we do know the environment changed. thousands of these non minnelli and species who could not adapt very quickly died out and that is when mammals became prominent in their ecological niche. anthropomorphize biological evolution and said it started -- as mammals evolved. by the time you get to primates it is no longer just a plant covering in the brain, it has all these convolutions. you are familiar with what the brain looks like. to expand its surface area. in the human or any primate it has all these fissures and curves. you can stretch out in theory and make a flat s
all the emphasis on genetics rather than the environment, which, of course, is a simple explanation. it also takes everybody off the hook. dr. gabor matÉ on attention deficit disorder, close encounters with drug addiction, and the destruction of american childhood. all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. today, a democracy now! special with the canadian physician and bestselling author gabor matÉ. from disease to addiction, parenting to attention deficit disorder, dr. matÉ's work focuses on the centrality of early childhood experiences to the development of the brain, and how those experiences can impact everything from behavioral patterns to physical and mental illness. while the relationship between emotional stress and disease, and mental and physical health more broadly, is often considered controversial within medical orthodoxy, dr. matÉ argues too many doctors seem to have forgotten what was once a commonplace assumption, that emotions are deeply implicated in both the development of illness, ad
be a fish or bird or species of some kind or for his spirit must rethink about the environment and our place an icon of the species of concern became honest. what we were doing to the environment and to ourselves in the process. so i think when we look back five decades in the rearview mirror, we can actually see the beginnings of this change in the way we think about the natural world. i call rachel carson a tipping point between these two things. she had a strong presence in the conservation movement and was really an effect founder of the modern environmental movement. i think it's possible to point to a specific movement in time when that happened, when we begin to think about our environment and relationship to the tiered it came in the late summer of 1962 a month before "silent spring" was published. in june 1962 from "the new yorker" magazine published excerpts from "silent spring" and through the course of the summer, huge controversy flared up around the book and people began to take sides, and people began to become worried about what carson was warning everyone about. by the end o
. hang out in this environment and you might see butterflies it, fennel, and then the lines. -- dandelions. is ada accessible. public transit is plentiful. we have conquered the steps, we have watched the dogs, and we have enjoyed a beautiful view. this is a place to take someone special on a romantic stroll and enjoyed a beautiful look out. welcome to corona heights located in the heart of this district. it offers a view of the downtown skyline, the bay bridge, and the east bay. it is one of the best kept secrets in the city. it is hardly ever crowded. on any given day, you will run into a few locals. , bought a 37 bus to get there without any parking worries. for legged friends can run freely. there is also a patch of grass for the small box. >> it is a great place. it is a wonderful place to have these kinds of parks. that dog owners appreciate it. >> take time to notice of the wildfires that are on the grassland and keep your head out on the lookout for hawks and other bird life. be sure to take your camera and be prepared to take a view of the city will not forget. it h
combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the north facade. two different levels of photo volume takes. >> we have over 600 solar panels and three platforms on the building, and four integrated wind turbines. the wind turbines and the solar panels produce 7% of the building's energy. and we're reducing the use of energy here by 32% in the office building. >> the entire building is controlled by a complex computer system which monitors and adjusts air, heating and lights as well as indoor
down. we have to take care of our environment. we need a rich canopy of trees in the city" and this what is means to so many people, and he was one of strong voice bs our environment. he has been known for that and in the years of 2000 he took up the college trustee on the board. many of you know in the past years he was passionate about his work at city college. he knew, and again we had the opportunity to share what we got out of college and what so many generations of youth would want and desire in our city college. he was leading the effort in my opinion to restore and to elevate the level of integrity and transparency at our city college. he demanded that of the other trustees as well as the administration . he went through some hard times as a trustee and shared with members here of the difficult years when things weren't as transparent as they should have been and integrity wasn't at the top of someone's mindful priorities but this is something he stood for. this is something him and his family stood for. as i know carolyn and her work on the status of woman an
really it increased service to our clients and reduced costs and really improved the bidding environment for our contractors. it's remarkable what she has done. >> been a public service -- being a public servant is a good thing. i love my job. i would never exchange it for anything else in the world. [applause] [applause] >> i am from the department of public works. i have the honor of introducing jocelyn quintos. i will just a real quick, jocelyn works very hard. through her work, a lot of contracts and a lot of work that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac for giving me this honor. i've never really won an award. it does feel like you won the oscars. it's different when you are standing here. i do not even have a written speech. i will speak from the heart. today is a very important day for me and my family because this happens to be my father's death anniversary. i want to dedicate this to my father. my
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
. >> of course i think about the environment, but i'm afraid the dozer -- that those that are used to traveling by car will not use the system. >> if the price of fuel was hired, people might not use car s, but people will not use it just because it is free. >> i do not think it really is free, because we are paying taxes. >> three-quarters of voters backed the proposal in a referendum. ho only one-fifth of those eligible took part in the polls. -- only one-fifth of those eligible took part in the poll. the opposition here says this is less about the clean environment, and more about political hot air. the mayor denies he is simply trying to win votes and says the scheme will pay for itself by attracting more business. >> i want it to be the green capital of the eu. >> some estimates say it costs $19 million, the waste of public money. >> there will have been no significant decrease in car transportation, or increase in public transport. that is why it is political. >> it is an idea that is catching on. they hosted a reception for other european cities interested in adopting the scheme. now eve
more smoke free environments at these festivals. many of you already know that exposure to secondhand smoke kills over 73,000 non-smokers each year in the u.s., so it's definitely second hand smoke is a toxic substance that leads to death of many non-smokers in the u.s. and at outdoor events it may exacerbate people's health issues, especially if you have asthma or other respiratory ailments and especially harmful for youth and elderly as well as individuals with these types of illnesses. according to the u.s. surgeon general, there's no safe level of exposure to second hand smoke and it's a cancer (inaudible) as well. outdoors second hand smoke that reach the same levels as indoughs so it's really not safe. for many months breathe california , as an institution working to create this ordinance that would require that a no smoking sign be posted on all street events, that several announcements be made to indicate that events are smoke free and that all promotional materials and advertising materials in events include information that the event is smoke free and in case of a violatio
not communicate with the officers. they are in a precarious situation. they worked at a much closer environment and they cannot be perceived as a snitch. or that they are working with the police department. they are there to, down, emotionally, the anchor. what they do then, we have a shooting war homicide. and they go to the hospital to be with the families. any talk of retaliation -- they will work with our social workers at the hospital. and whether the retaliation must go next. to saturate and prevent and interrupt any violence that may occur. this is a component or peace that has been building. i polled the captains of payview, mission, ingleside and the northern district. these are the most affected by gang violence. they said they appreciated what the crn did what they want to see them more. they need to fill that communication. it also comes down to training and trust, to be able to have them talk to officers. they would address the officers, they had arrested some of them, when there were actually under. they will help the police and the community. under his guidance we are the most ac
environment and she been such a great champion of public transportation that even cal train named a loco motor after jackie spear. please welcome congress woman jackie spear. >> thank you mr. mayor. thank you secretary lahood. thank you to the incredible leadership, senator feinstein, nancy pelosi and mayor lee and the board of supervisors to chairman nol an from the sfmta. i am on pins and needles. do we have anything else to report? it's still at the same point we think they're in commercials. i am reminded from the song from "top gun" "take my breath away" and $942 million takes my breath away and i think to mayor lee for that amount i think we should get a leather flight jacket to thank mr. lahood for the great gift to our great city. the new money that is going to be used here is going to create 1,000 new jobs before the end of the year with many more jobs to come after that. that is something to applaud. thank you again secretary lahood for that. this is one point 7 miles very similar to the length of the golden gate bridge when 75 years ago that was going to be built and littl
of integrating art into the airport environment with the addition of five new commissions that are as bold and dynamic as the new building. >> this project was completed in record time, and we were able to integrate the artist's early enough in the process that they could work with the architect said that the work that is completed is the work that really helps complement and instill the space as opposed to being tucked away in a corner. >> be experience begins with the glass facades that was designed with over 120 laminated glass panels. it captures the experience of being under or over clouds when flying in a plane. depending on the distance or point of view, it can appear clear for more abstract and atmospheric. the subtle colors change gradually depending on the light and the time of day. >> i wanted to create an art work that looks over time as well as working on in the first glance. the first time you come here, you may not see a. but you may be able to see one side over the other. it features a couple of suspended sculptures. each was created out of a series of flat plains run paral
it, is the things we are doing to the environment, making these things more unbearable. construction, an earthquake there was one in chile that killed less than a hundred people, fewer than a hundred people. all of these things, and people have been forced to leave the countryside, to come to the city. so we often also discussed these things and how devotion in the land -- how it causes us to have these massive mudslides and flooding when a hurricane goes through. these things, they are more of the things that we can do something about as a community. but these other theories, they are also talked about. >> host: in reading through your book, "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know", i was struck that so many writers return to haiti. >> guest: i think so many of us come as children. we were a lot like our parents. arkansas like they had no choice to leave. so you do have this yearning for your country. and i have a lot of family that i did quite a lot. but there is this yearning, things that are parents described as a paradise and things to f
as a spokesperson for underprivileged children and the environment. >> hi. i'm so glad you could join me because i have an exciting story for you. a few short months ago, i suffered with inflammation, just like so many of you. the worst was in my hip. things like stairs and getting out of the car were hard for me. hiking is a passion for me; i've hiked all over the world. i've spent time in africa, hiked the copper canyon, been to the arctic, even the inca trail. but my hip got so bad, i couldn't do a basic hike anymore. i tried a lot of things, but nothing seemed to work. then i heard about nopalea. i'd love to tell you that i tried it right then and there, but i'm skeptical, so it sat on my kitchen counter until i thought, i have to try it. in about a month, the pain had diminished dramatically. eventually, i was able to plan my next hiking trip. my only regret is that i waited so long to try it. if you've suffered with inflammation or chronic pain for years, there is something that can help. that's why i'm here-- to share nopalea and more remarkable success stories with you. >> the nopal cactus
in an environment like this, how are you going to compel businesses, fast food joints and the rest, but it's in there interest to raise the rates when they e barely getting by as it is just as henry ford did back before world war i to $5. he said he wanted people to buy the cards. that's what you got to do. neil: so what about substance of the country where they have jobs with $10 an hour. were people really aren't jumping on these jobs. where we have a country where help wanted advertising is at an all-time high. a lot of people, for whatever reason, it are having trouble with work. >> we are talking between seven and a quarter and 10. he would get a long-overdue pay raise just to in just to inflation. if you have rick santorum and mitt romney saying the minimum wage should be ingested, that would put pressure on them. >> let me ask you this. do you think the people are as tired of the notion of government could do something? we have seen a little bang for the buck. a lot of people are going the other way. they a careful to go that way because they remember republicans. but is there a lim
problems to the environment. you may not even know you are eating it. to find out if it is worth the money, let's bring in doctor mitchell brooks. thank you for coming in tonight. are you comfortable with this? >> certainly. melissa: why? it feels creepy to the average person. there is just something about it that makes me very nervous for potential harm down the road. >> i think it is the word. the fishes larger. it can be produced faster. it is proving to be safer. there is no harm for a bit. we will have a decrease in edible food. we have climate change. we are people hungry. here is our chance to feed them. we tested all third genetically so it could be grown in countries all over the world. melissa: let me stop you and go back a little bit, right you said you could trust a government agency. >> no, i do. basically, you know, for the conspiracy theorists out there, i suppose, i put that in, these folks do a good job. they have been charged with our safety. they believe it is safe. melissa: do you think they have done enough research? you feel confident this will not be one of those. >>
this new environment, be it political or social environment has changed. people want to do more. sometimes people will do it as volunteers. want to be part of a cause. the one to be part of the solution. if there is a problem out there, a social problem, they want to help. i can see more people, more women, doing that. we should be talking about this and engaging more people. i think there are a lot of women leaders who would be happy to help impart their knowledge and experience. 20 years ago, there were not forums like this. he did not have the secretary of labor like me. these were things that occur but they did not happen by accident. a lot of people have been working to help make this a reality and it is a reflection of what is happening in our country. i have to give a lot of credit to our president and people like speaker nancy pelosi and senator barbara boxer and supervisor glory molina. >> would you go back into elected office? >> there is a lot of issues i care about -- health care, health care disparities, environmental justice, that is a big issue and will continue to be until
of hunter and gatherer in very resource poor environments for most nobody had any kind of wealth so any redistribution had to be done fairly equally or else it was obvious somebody was getting more than somebody else through unfair means. that is how it was throughout history. john: i wouldhink when we lived in the clan or the tribe there was an elder or a few of them who ran things. >> right, there is a chief or a big man that solves the problems, so we tend to look up to the alpha male. you solve the problem for us, you make the decision for us if we can't.wnç it. john: do you agree with that? >> with a lot of it. we live in an advanced industrial economy where market inlves millions of people interacting the don't have an understanding of the consequences and that kind of world. we evolved were the people around you were family, friends, people you are in intimate contact with everyday. our moral intuition of cooperation and sharing evolved from the small-scale operation where you knew everybody you are interacting with and you could see if they were contributing, whether they were
of the rules and regulations that are costly to our economy with little benefit to the environment. john: i came to the same conclusion but most people say what r-utah king about? it makes america cleaner. or reaction to unemployment making people sick? >> look at 40 years ago. the air and of water is cleaner. but now to get a small improvement is very expensive with energy and dollars and who fought. health. and a stroke, heart disease, depression, depress ion and cancer and a higher rate of suicide. john: that means the factory may not open and every business takes longer. money going to create new things goes to pollution-control. >> closes down coal-fired power plants. there has been 50. impact of that to on the community with those who have paid jobs the issue over 1300 regulations better economically significant. john: epa admits that but the cost is over $100 million per regulation but the benefits are so great which is a reduction of future health care cost. a cost is real but benefits are unknown but these people are out of work and we know people are made sick and the tests they c
's a reasonable possibility that the project will have significant effect on the environment due to unusual circumstances, you can't use a categorical exemption. a lot of our submissions, and those of -- in support of us which are part of the record talk about the congestion that would be increased, the circling of parking, the density of the neighborhood, the fact that there are wood framed structures in the neighborhood, fire safety would be impeded. i mean they remove the bulb-out at filleti's market because the struks can't get by. if a delivery truck can't get by what about fire trucks. when you look at the entire neighborhood as a whole and combined with the fact that you have these raised concrete plantares which are totally new and unique and they are a part of the permanent physical structure, and the fact that you have about 29 or 31 driveways on the scott -- i mean on oak, that would be impacted, just again getting to the density of people having to back in and out, past this bike lane, and when you consider that not many bicycles don't use lights, day or night, many of them blow
to our transportation system. we want people to get around in a way that steps lightly on the environment. we want people to get around in ways that are enjoyable. and that really contribute to what makes san francisco special, such as our wonderful cable cars. but above all, we want to make sure that people can get around the city safely. it's no good to have a great transportation system if people can't get around safely. people need to not only be able to be safe, but to be able to feel safe, and nowhere is that more important than when you're on foot because that is when you're arguably the most vulnerable. it's also how every trip starts and ends. and many trips in san francisco, and we want more of them in between, to be on foot as well because it's a nicer way to enjoy the city. but if we want people to be out and walking, we need them to be safe. we want them to feel safe, and that's what we're here to talk about today. and none of that will happen without great leadership. so, without further ado, happy to bring up our great leader, the mayor of the city and county, ed lee. (appl
with eucalyptus trees. long paths allow you to meander, perfect for dog walking in a wooded environment. >> i enjoy this base and the history behind it. the diversity that exists in such an urban city, the concrete, the streets, cars, we have this oasis of a natural environment. it reminds us of what san francisco initially was. >> this is a section for dogs and plenty of parking. transit is available to get you there easily. and the part is ada -- park is ada accessible. there is also a natural lake. this is your chance to stroll and let the kids run free. it also has many birds to watch. it is the place to find some solitude from the city and appreciate what you share with a wonderful breath of fresh air. , an experienced this park and enjoy the peoples, picnics, and sunshine. this is a lovely place to take a stroll with your loved one hand in hand. located in the middle of pacific heights on top of a hill, lafayette park offers a great square a of a peaceful beauty. large trees border greenery. it features tables and benches, a playground, restaurants, and tennis courts. there are plenty
of our preferences or the inability to control our preferences. we are victims of our environments growing up. we are victims of our context that we live in and, therefore, we all, you know, are not "responsible for that behavior and therefore should be mitigating." when you look at the testimony that comes in, whether it's from a mother or from neighbors or from teachers that are talking about really mitigating circumstances, they are the rotten social background kind of arguments, the abuse and the suffering that that individual experienced and those things show up in the brain. the brain is also a sponge. the brain isn't simply created by genetics and it's very much shaped by environment. and so my mentor john monaghan likened the problem of predicting violent people to predicting violent storms. when you think of meteorology, you think of the difficulty of classifying a hurricane and tracking a hurricane, making judgments about such complex behavior that has sort of chaotic premises underlying it, you're going to make lots of mistakes. you're going to make lots of mistakes in b
and sprendz of course the situation here is is different being in the environment we are in. even then there is still a lot of things look around and be thankful for. other thing interesting out here is he seeing all the different nationalities and how everybody kind of celebrates in their own way with makeshift decorations and really cool environment. ♪ heaven and nature sing. some of our u.s. troops got together with nato counterparts to sing christmas carols and making the best of it interesting information out of the pentagon. the u.s. army is reporting that it's taking action to stop the growing terror threat in africa now. beginning next year. army officials are saying that they will send small teams into as many as 35 african nations to train and equip africans against extremists. this comes amidst violence in north africa including september 11th attack on the u.s. consulate in libya. officials have said terrorists with ties to al qaeda may have carried out that assault killing our ambassador, chris stevens and three other americans. and the commander of an elite team of
and change live in ways, not for yourself but also for your family, the environment, the country. >> personal happiness is when my family as well and we can see each other from time to time. >> i believe you have to help make happiness happen. you do not leave everything to chance. it depends on you to make happiness what you wanted to. >> happiness is a fleeting feeling that you often do not understand or notice. you just realize it when it is gone. >> somewhat for happiness in family life, others of their careers. i am in a phase of my life that is career-oriented. i will be happy when i can really assert myself and reach my goals. >> i was very happy when my children were born. it was a great happiness. it is not money or work that make me happy. rather, watching my children grow up and get married. that, to me, is happiness. >> richard, what is the key to happiness? >> being in my new apartment two days before christmas eve was not bad. being here with you on christmas is not bad. >> that was my answer. >> the international u.n. convoy is meeting with syrian president assaad to talk about
that you heard from public comment. and anything that you would like to add. in the environment and which our officers have to work. i think that it is incredibly important and i want to leave a quick note that we have trained, one of the best trained departments in the country identifying with the mental health and in 2001, we began the initial training of 40 hours of 40-hour training for each officer in the mental health awareness, the deescalation building and that went from 2001 to 2010. that was done in conjunction with the mental health board and the members of our department were trained and provided that training. in 2010, i believe, when the chief came on and we began having the discussion about adopting a different model. adopting a key to dealing with individuals in crisis and we looked at other agency and looked at memphis who had the model and in place for some time and partially adopted that model. today as i indicated on top of the 983 members that were trained over the last ten years, we have trained since the last year, 118 of our own and some of other agencies. the work
anticipate working with community based organizations and programs like environment now to target 20,000 households. we expect that we will actually reach and have direct conversations with 5400 households and that means we're looking at being 99% confident of the results of this survey with a not more than 2% margin for error or deviation from that. this will include distribution of postcards and other materials at community events and festivals across the city as well as this door to door "hi we're the cleanpower sf program and we want to talk about our offering". we're also going to -- in recognition of the fact some folks have called us and said "hey we're hearing about this program and we're interested". we're going to allow some commercial customers that seem to be expressing more than of an environmental consciousness based interest in our program to sort of cue up and be participants in this program, so we our -- our prime area focus is residential but we will let commercial customer who is are interested be part of the program and make sure that we hear from them and right
to promote tap water it's better for the environment is it saves residents money and cuts down on the sugary consumption of beverages as well. and i also want to invite residents that i'm hold be coffee hours on ole gai ass cafe on the outer rich mopped and then my evening hours have a bear with me at steins on clement street and eight avenue near the old colosseum theater and on sat i'll be joining with the justice committee commemorating the 75th anniversary of the terrible tragedy 75 year ago at the chinese cultural center. the rest i'll submit. >> thank you mr. avalos. >> colleague i have one item for intrusion today it's an ordinance that would require the wick epipark commission to hold information hearing on permit complications for large scale multiday events in our parks only this will help the lincoln's park outreach around these expeftsz promote public trust and this ordinance would not effect outside lands what this ordinance would basket would be required for event that occupy 25% or more of the area of the park for longer than 48 hours and so outside land is only a small
and environment review of the quint jerrioconnector road. >> and i do have a speaker card. labron is there any another member that would like to speak on this item please come forward. >> i have a presentation. >> there we go. >> back in 2005, thank you for the opportunity. the committee have landed on the beautiful station design and they ran two rams which you can see at the bottom and a pedestrian underpass under the quint street bridge. now i move forward to 2012, and we need the ability of having two more tracks for high speed rail and cal train so that we don't... on transbay and the problem now that we have is where the proposal is to put a connector road, we no longer with the room to put in the platform and so that becomes the real issue. as you can see from the design, the ramps have disappeared and the pedestrian and the pass is also gone, so i would like to do in the time that is remaining, is to show you a solution which is to design a modio which is the foundation for the station that could be installed over a couple of days. and while we wait for this to come up, while this is r
country's most vulnerable people that we create healthy environments and green spaces and by country men and women become fully conscious of their ability to change things for the better. >> baptist from haiti. my wish is for more justice, economic as well as social justice, starting with the recognition that poverty is not a sin. >> i wish for wish for a world without boarders and walls, age 53, argentina. [ applause ] >> i wish for a world where the children are more just and more kind and fair in the world than the one we know. president, barack obama. >> and now, this is a good one, that donna and i can very strongly identify with. i wish that male fashion designers would be forced to wear the things that they create for women like stelleto heals and it gets better. and that all politicians would have to live by the rules and laws they come up with for the rest of us like the ones on food stamps and the minimum wage by isabel, ienda >> i promise that i will not take my clothes off in public. >> i wish it would snow in the morning so nobody does not have to go to school for two weeks,
the important things, they are all from pretty average environments. extremely different in terms of structure. does this go towards mitigation? how should it be used? how should this information be used to? i use it to dole out treatment. that is how i thought we would kick start this seminar. i am happy to answer any other questions. i did not do this all by myself. i had a lot of individuals who helped me with this data. this research is all funded by the national research of health, your tax dollars. thank you for your attention. i will turn over to our moderator. thank you. [applause] >> actually, i would like to, i'm going to ask a few questions, but i was hoping we could get a debate going here rather than with me trying to ask intelligent questions and just have the very smart people just talking amongst themselves to educate us. so one of the questions that we're wanting to talk about today was the idea of free will in terms of the criminal justice system. and i would like to ask each of you, is there a definition of free will in the context of your individual work? we'll start with y
. the overburdensome regulatory environment that we're in is depressing growth, particularly for small business. and i think that's a primary distinction here as we talk about business itself because all business is not created equal and the president's jobs council who has some wonderful folks, some friends of mind on it, wholly inefficient in my view because there is no representation from small business on that jobs council. melissa: yeah. catherine, let me ask you, when i look what happened in this case of darden because it seems like something that has happened to a bunch of different companies, my takeaway at the end of the day for sure they're not going to hire anyone and that's what we need more than anything right now. >> you're exactly right. what we need is jobs, jobs, jobs. and there is so much uncertainty out there right now with what is going to happen with taxes. we still don't know the full impacts of obamacare. hundreds of thousands of new regulations and we need to know what is going on to make good decisions and grow our businesses because of that. melissa: but, jamie, don't you thi
. i want to get a healthy economy and environment and we can do both but the benefits are unknown we are not helping our country. john: more examples of what you think you know, may not be true. do you steel ever? my cameras catch people in my cameras catch people in the act. [ malennouncer ] it's tt time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you realldon't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it findone, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all youeed is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi.com/pricerewind. john: we all have biases but i believed scientists are special, us march, unbiased comment trustworthy. >> accurate, down to earth. >> nerdy. >> i know a lot of research scientt who are dry. >> my eight older brother is a scientist. he could be dry. he is weird and angry. thought of volatility is common author of f
that was happening in the area. a number of different things in environment that we had no idea. later, many kids in my neighborhood, i worked at the plant myself. got a sense of what it's like to be on the inside of the plant. there was one evening when i came home, from work at rocky flats, and turned on the television and it was a show on "nightline" that it was an exposÉ of what was really happening at the plant. and it was the first time that a really have an awareness, really have an understanding of what was happening at rocky flats and how extent -- extraordinary the contamination was but it was on that day i decided to quit my job at rocky flats come at the day i decided i would write a book about it. it took me about 10 years of research and writing to pull the story together. and i wanted to write a book that reads like a novel, but is very heavily footnoted come everything in the book is factual. so you can check back and see where the information comes from. but i wanted to write this story from the perspective of all of the different kinds of people whose lives have been affected b
environment? [applause? >> that is a terrific question. it is hard to answer but part of the answer is the following -- when lyndon johnson became majority leader of the senate in 1955, the senate was and had been for decades, let's put it that way, the same mess, the same dysfunctional mess that it is today. bills couldn't get past because the power than that confronted a president wasn't a party, wasn't republicans against democrats, it was an interparty division. half of the democrats in the senate were southern democrats who were as conservative as can be imagined on civil-rights and everything else. they in that year, 1975, the 16 great standing committees and the senate, the republicans were -- seeing your committee posts were stacked and subcommittees were headed buy them. they had stopped every president. no one seems to realize this but in the 25 years after the supreme court packing fight when southern conservatives realize they and the midwestern republicans were on the same side and could control congress no president, not franklin roosevelt, not truman, ever got a major
could argue well in the environment of a hospital the psych teches work there are no weapons, but that argument holds no, does not have any validity because the vast majority of cases where people are tased no weapon was involved on the part of the victim. it is true that the... it is true that there is a higher percentage of them that have been tased. this is from national data. and i think that it is also just manifestly obvious that it is going to be used for in cases of lack of compliance, rather than dangers, no tasers. >> i oppose the use of tasers and i am not from the city but i have friends and family here in sf and i am from southern county and i am here because i would oppose the use of tasers in my city just as would oppose it and i am taking steps to make sure that the county is addressing these concerns. and i lived in the city for series of years when i got my ba in psychology at san francisco state and i am also a social worker. and general and i want to say that in does not take a rocket scientist to speculate that tasers will or will not do harm to someone w
in absence of traffic and perp dishtion lard to the tracks to make for a much safer environment. we've got new signage and pavement markings to make that clear. as everybody was stuck on the subway, i rode my bike yesterday and rode passed it. it's a significant safety improvement, not bust for cyclists, but for f line operators. it's a very busy area. we have 120 people -- it's about a third of the left turns off of market street during rush hour, our cyclists. so, they're taking a whole lot of vehicles off the road by being on their bikes. this will enable them to do so safety and connective. we have the greenway signal times for bicycle speed. so, small but significant safety improvement there. moving on to parking, last thursday we met with residents and merchants in the northeast mission area. you may recall, i guess it was earlier this year, we rolled out coined of a large parking management strategy covering a large area including potrero hill and dogpatch and mission bay. we got pretty significant feedback and it was not positive feedback in terms of our plan and process. so, as we
report is because already, the environment has become hostile. because all the neighbors and business owners know i'm a cyclist i hear every day the grievances how this is a serious negative impact on their lives, on the ability to live in the neighborhood, not only for customers and parking, but for dealing with picking up kids, dealing with even environmental reasons like sound. my house now used to have cars parked out there, they were a nice buffer, now there's a ricochet of a wall blasting on my window. i think i'll stick with the environmental issues because there's a better plan -- i mean the other plans were drawn up to benefit cyclists. i'm a cyclist -- cycling first. this is a four lane freeway, cars going faster, they're using ann and scott on fell cars flip-flop immediately. we have 10 cars -- it's probably the craziest design i've ever seen and by far not safer than the way it was previously. i please hope you give some environmental review. thank you. >> president chiu: thanks. next speaker. >> thank you. my name is wendy cook and i'm a resident in the neighborhood. this
of a significant effect on the environment due to unusual circumstances. or if, quote, significant cumulative impacts from projects of the same type will result. this plan will cause significant direct secondary and cumulative impacts, increase delays on oak, fell, and intersecting streets due to direct and secondary parking impacts, signal timing changes amounted cumulative impact on traffic and public safety due to removal of parking, embedments to turning, access to and from the 31 curb cuts that will be affected and reduced visibility on such busy corridors. the masonic avenue bicycle project is only three blocks away yet the city claims they do not overlap so this should not be studied. the masonic plan will remove 167 parking spaces and all commute lanes. there is a target store planned on masonic and geary which will add to the traffic in the area. removing the commuter lane, adding raised plantares throughout the buffer strip and removing over 90 parking spaces constitutes an unusual circumstance of the project. proposed parking mitigation peat adequate. this is a highly dense tourist
. some of our panelists will address those. even though now we are in an environment where there is a republican majority in the house and a slimmer majority in the senate, please note that the leader and democrats are going fight hard to keep their agenda and restart our economy, and there will be more work to be done. i would like to hand over the podium to nicole rivera, who put this together. she will introduce the panelists and go over some logistics. i want to point out quickly that we are being recorded by san francisco government tv. the camera in front is only aimed at the podium. it is not taking shots of the audience, only the podium for people who want to ask questions. so do not worry, you are not on tv if you do not want to be. >> thank you for your patience. i am a representative with leader pelosi, and i'm thrilled to have you today to learn more of our best practices for accessing credit. it is a priority for our office. we are very well aware of how small businesses are running up against the wall right now in terms of trying to get the credit and loans th
the environment. so, the green button here we are in san francisco, i can say with some public comfort that pg&e is a signatory to the green button, download my data. and basically you go to the utility website. you can download your own green button data which by itself is, well, i'm an energy guy, an energy geek. i consider with confidence. it is not interesting, necessarily, but when you take your green button data and you give it to some companies, they have amazing things they can do with that green button to, again, save you money. something as simple as if you look at your green button which is kilowatt hours for those that are engineering minded, a line grab if you think about t some companies today can look at your green button and figure out if your refrigerator is broken function need a new air conditioner. that's real money if you think about it at a commercial or industrial scale. that is one data set. to your other question about what is the federal government doing, we're seeking not just an energy, but across the government to engage entrepreneurs and innovators across all the
to inspire individuals in my work environment or on the job. after i went on to college, the campus asked me to be a recruiter for them. i went back to my high school and got a record number of people to apply to the university. the power and the emotion, the fire in the belly is there in us. for people that did not have role models, they need to be inspired. i did not always get it from women. find it in other places, all that helps. that is the kind of energy that was given to me. "i'm going to take a risk. i may not be perfect at it." >> do you work all the time? >> i am in mourning person -- morning person. >> i could be on the west coast and i am not at 5:00 a.m. and people on the west coast would say i'm crazy. i will lose the thought so why do wit. i am an early riser. that was something that was instilled in us. >> is 5:00 a.m. kind of typical? >> yes. >> how late did you work? >> i tried to get in at a decent hour. as a pastime, people do not think that we do this but i like to cook. i try to eat healthy. i will do cooking of vegetables and light entrees. something i enjoy is making
that says you're a person do too. you know you deeply moving. it was in this environment the ronald reagan went to sea pack and said we need bold colors no pale pastel. he was throwing down a battle sign. he was saying don't tell me you have a sellout. don't tell me you have a cave. don't tell me you have do whatever the left wants. there are moments in history where you draw a line and fight. we have thirty governors. we a huge number of state legislators. the idea we are supposed to create a center caucus in order to be socially acceptable in washington is absurd. that's what people are currently forming in washington. how much do i need to surrender so he won't beat me anymore? when i was family elected to congress, it turns out of my bad scheduling with the second time i ran jimmy carter was head of the democratic ticket. it was the best campaign technical ily i ever ran. it felt good toward the end. everything feels right because you're the candidate in the middle of the mess. i went in to vote on election day 1973 and the state of georgia was and i found myself standing in line. behi
and we are all products of our environment. the valley of death, the korengal valley was called that because of the amount of contact we were taking, the amount of firefights. small arms fire, rpgs, rockets, whatever it may be. that tour for us was a 15-month tour, which was -- that's pretty long for -- >> that's a long time. >> -- for some young people. and we did what we were trained to do. we engaged the populous. we're there to hopefully make their lives better. help them out, find better ways to help them do the same thing they've been doing. and when i wrote the book, i wrote the book to one describe the valley, but, two, to describe the people around me. so often i'm congratulated or patted on the back or thanked. i've never done anything in the military alone. that's one the military does really great, is build a team and keep the team together. and kind of writing the book, i was able to put my buddies' names in print and highlight the actions that they have done, because there's so many great things that men and women in uniform do every single day and we don't hear ab
in that environment is to have it both ways. my view is there is too much classified information. my view is there is too much secrecy in general, and we should probably we think a lot of how we do it. i am inclined to want to see diplomats like susan rice to be as candid as possible with the public. there is another view on that, that we spell too many secrets. -- spill too many secrets. host: this goes back to the 9/11 commission and how intelligence is shared amongst agencies. guest: to me, it is one of these fascinating things that always comes up. whenever there is a catastrophe like 9/11 or the u.s.s. cole, everybody always says they did not share the information. one part of the government had one piece and they did not connect the dots. in the intelligence business, you're getting information from very technical sources or wiretaps or satellites that we do not want other people to know about. people in the business want to usually keep the stuff they collect in as small a group responsible in order to avoid the other big problem of moles and so forth. if you look at wikileaks, thi
. ultimately that was what we knew and what we understood about our environment. >> within the family, what were some of the dynamics? >> my father was latin -- mexico-american. my mother was european-american so that kind of created a very tense -- sort of other complicated household, and they had a lot of children right away, in the late '60s, early 70s, and i don't know if this is actually traditional to most hispanic or latin american families but my sisters were the property of my mother, and my brother and myself were the property of my dad, and as boys, working with a father who own as trucking company, we were sort of like the indentured laborers and my sisters were learning this phenomenal, idealic lifestyle aspirin successes. so that's one of the tensions i draw from early on in the book. >> how much of your family is still alive and what did they think of the book? >> every member of my family is still alive. even my grandmother, and while the story is tough and gritty, they've actually been supportive. my mother and my father haven't really come to terms with it. they find the s
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